Water Pressure?

Proper Job Pop Ups - Water Pressure?

Pop Ups & Deep Water

Due to several request from customers asking what effects depths of water have on the pop ups, I have carried out some tests using a Watch Makers Pressure Testing Vessel (this device is used by watch makers to test if a wrist watch will remain waterproof at a set depth).
Below is a set of images showing the pressure vessel, the size of pop up being tested along with details of the rig and split shot which has been added, the depth at which the test was carried out and the time/duration of the test.
 


Image 03 shows a detailed close up of the pressure tester’s pressure gauge.
You will notice that the inner circle of figures relates to feet (depth at which anything inside the vessel can be pressurised to) and is probably the only thing most of us will be interested in
Image 01 & 02 show the Pressure Tester

Let the Tests Begin

Testing a “Tip” @ 20 feet
 

Image 04 shows a single “Tip” pop up and a size 7 E.S.P. T6 Raptor hook which has been balanced with a number 4 split shot and placed in the pressure vessel in an Un-pressurised state.

Image 05 shows the pressure vessel pressurised to a depth/equivalent of 20 feet (as shown on the gauge)

Image 06 shows the “Tip” pop up after 24 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 20 feet and I think the effects on the “Tip” at this depth are negligible.

 

Image 07 shows the “Tip” pop up after 48 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 20 feet and I think the effects on the “Tip” at this depth are still negligible, which leads me to the opinion that one could confidently use this type of setup at depths of up to 20 feet for at least 48 hours knowing that your presentation will remain spot on.

Testing a 11 miller @ 40 feet
 

Image 08 shows a single 11 miller pop up and a size 7 E.S.P. T6 Raptor hook which has been balanced with 3 x number 6 split shot and placed in the pressure vessel in an Un-pressurised state

Image 09 shows the pressure vessel pressurised to a depth/equivalent of 40 feet (as shown on the gauge)

 

Image 10 shows the 11 miller pop up after 48 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 40 feet and I think the effects on the 11 miller at this depth are negligible, which leads me to the opinion that one could confidently use this type of setup at depths of up to 40 feet for at least 48 hours knowing that your presentation will remain spot on.

Testing a 13 miller @ 40 feet
 

Image 11 shows a single 13 miller pop up, Korda size 6 L.S.X. hook complete with micro swivel and line aligner. The rig was then balanced with a small amount of putty and 3 x number 6 split shot and placed in the pressure vessel in an Un-pressurised state.

 

Image 12 shows the pressure vessel pressurised to a depth/equivalent of 40 feet (as shown on the gauge)

 

 

Image 13 shows the immediate effect of the initial pressurisation of the pop up to a depth/equivalent of 40 feet, which shows the rig has dipped very slightly under the pressure.

 

Image 14 shows the 13 miller pop up after 24 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 40 feet. I think the image speaks for its self with the centrally position number 6 shot now forming the point of balance.

Image 15 shows the 13 miller pop up after 48 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 40 feet. You can now see for yourselves that the difference in buoyancy between this image and the 24 hour image is negligible

Testing a 11 miller @ 60 feet
 

Image 16 shows a single 11 miller pop up and a size 7 E.S.P. T6 Raptor hook which has been balanced with 3 x number 6 split shot and placed in the pressure vessel in an Un-pressurised state. If you look very carefully you can see that the lower shot is just a hairs breath above the bottom of the vessel.

 

 

Image 17 shows the pressure vessel pressurised to a depth/equivalent of 60 feet (as shown on the gauge).

 

Image 18 shows the immediate effect of the initial pressurisation of the pop up to a depth/equivalent of 60 feet, which shows the lower shot has dropped very slightly under the pressure and it is now resting on the bottom of the vessel.

 

Image 19 shows the 11 miller pop up after 24 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 60 feet. I think the image speaks for its self with the centrally position number 6 shot now forming the point of balance.

 

Image 20 shows the 11 miller pop up after 48 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 60 feet and I think the effects on the 11 miller at this depth are not good in terms of buoyancy, but having said that the hook is still clear of the bottom of the vessel, which leads me to form the opinion that one could confidently use this type of setup at depths of up to 60 feet for at least the first 24 hours knowing that your presentation will remain spot on and if you wish to leave this presentation any longer than this (48 hours), I will leave that one down to you.

 

Testing a 13 miller @ 60 feet
 

Image 21 shows a single 13 miller pop up, Korda size 6 L.S.X. hook complete with micro swivel and line aligner. The rig was then balanced with a small amount of putty and 3 x number 6 split shot and placed in the pressure vessel in an Un-pressurised state.

 

 

Image 22 shows the pressure vessel pressurised to a depth/equivalent of 60 feet (as shown on the gauge)

 

Image 23 shows the immediate effect of the initial pressurisation of the pop up to a depth/equivalent of 60 feet, which shows the balancing putty at the end of the rig has dropped a negligible amount under the increased pressure.

 

Image 24 shows the 13 miller pop up after 24 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 60 feet. I think the image speaks for its self with the number 6 shot nearest the hook now showing just clear of the bottom of the vessel with the hook still stood upright and in a good position, ready for a take.

 

Image 25 shows the 13 miller pop up after 48 hours of immersion at a depth/equivalent of 60 feet. I think this image also speaks for its self as all the split shot are now laying on the bottom of the vessel and the hook is leaning over at an angle which is not good for consistent hooking, which leads me to form the opinion that one could confidently use this type of setup at depths of up to 60 feet for the first 24 hours and after this time the pop up would need to be change to maintain an efficient hooking set up.

 

Testing a 11 miller @ 100 feet (the kiss of death)
 

Image 26 shows a single 11 miller pop up and a size 7 E.S.P. T6 Raptor hook which has been balanced with 3 x number 6 split shot and placed in the pressure vessel in an Un-pressurised state

 

Image 27 shows the pressure vessel pressurised to a depth/equivalent of 100 feet (as shown on the gauge).

 

Image 28 shows the immediate effect of the initial pressurisation of the pop up to a depth/equivalent of 100 feet, which shows the lower shot has dropped under the pressure and it is now resting on the bottom of the vessel.

 

Image 29 shows the effects of the pressure after just 5 minutes of immersion, with two of the three split shot now lying on the bottom of the vessel.

 

Image 30 shows the effects of the pressure after just 1 hour of immersion, with all of the three split shot now lying on the bottom of the vessel and the hook barely clear of the bottom of the vessel. I think it would be fair to say “depths of 100 feet wrecked the pops in a matter of minutes”.

 

Notes:

1/ As a general rule of thumb, all Proper Job Pops take on the equivalent weight of water equal to that of a single number 6 split shot in the first 2-3 hours of immersion in the water.

2/ You may of noticed that the tests I have carried out only show a 48 hour period of time, and I claim that my pop ups will remain buoyant for at least 7 days. Now with the exception of the “Tips” and depths approaching 60 feet or greater than 60 feet, I still stand by this statement as it has been my findings that once the pop ups have taken on their initial dose of water, and stabilised in their environment, they will remain buoyant for at least 7 days.

Summary

I guess that most of what is explained above will be of no practical use to anglers fishing in depths of less than 40 feet as the Proper Jobs are fairly unaffected by depths up to 40 feet, but it’s always good to know what’s happening down below just for confidence sake as much as anything else, but for all you folk fishing the likes of Bundy’s Pit where depths approaching 60 feet can be on the menu, I think the above will be very useful.


Copyright © 2017 Proper Job Pop Ups (UK) Ltd. Powered by Zen Cart. Web design by derekbryant.co.uk